Interracial dating attitudes among college students

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Non-Asian guys usually take a step back, take a good look at me, and, with the little wheels in their heads slowly chugging away, they find the only feasible sentence worth saying is, simply: To which I cheerfully reply, “Nope. I just hate ugly faces.” Watching them walk away with those faces contorted with puzzlement is so amusing, but that’s only if they leave at that moment. “Well…what do Asian guys have that make them so special? You’re too young to say what you do and don’t like…” etc.

They’re either completely confused and/or jealous as to why an attractive white woman like myself (if I might be conceited enough to say) likes only Asian men.

Introduction Interracial relationships have experienced intense struggles and obstacles in the history of the United States.

Many areas of the country forbade interracial relationships, and punishment included imprisonment and even death (Todd & Mckinney, 1992).

However, there were differences in both attitude and experience among ethnic groups.

ABSTRACT: This article examines the impact of religious socialization on Americans’ propensity to engage in interracial dating or romance.

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Almost one fourth (24.2%) reported having dated interracially and almost half (49.6%) expressed an openness to become involved in an interracial relationship.

Subjects (196 men, 367 women) were surveyed with regard to their willingness to be romantically involved interracially or interculturally along with their actual interracial dating experience.

Analysis indicated a high willingness in all ethnic groups to be romantically involved as well as an absence of sex difference with regard to both attitude and experience.

For example, programs and activities implemented to meet the needs of latchkey children have included extended-day programs in public schools, after-school hotlines, and neighborhood “block mothers” (Lamorey, Robinson, Rowland, Coleman, 1998).

Along with other unofficial programs and activities, these likely have contributed to children developing viewpoints and social comforts beyond the influences of their primary caregivers.

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